Demolition campaign avoids high-end villas – The New Indian Express

There is a noticeable change in the Karnataka government’s stance on the demolition of encroachments on lake beds, culverts and wetlands in Bengaluru. After the embarrassment of flooding along the IT Corridor a fortnight ago, the government had vehemently declared that all offending properties would be demolished, but suddenly it’s singing a different tune. He is now looking to conduct a “resurvey” of the affected region before razing any encroachment.

Unsurprisingly, since the region is home to the who’s who of the corporate and startup world. The imperatives are clear: with the approach of municipal and legislative elections, the government cannot afford to ruffle important feathers; it must also protect the builder-politician bond that is primarily responsible for turning wetlands into a concrete jungle, and the role played by civic organizations in this ecological disaster.

The Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP), which pretended to correct (its own) planning errors, launched bulldozers and compiled a list of big builders who got it wrong, and even demolished parts of a few properties. But not for long. The teardown campaign has become embroiled in political slander and a blame game between government and opposition.

Meanwhile, some big builders have approached the High Court for a stay, giving the government a legitimate reason to stop all action. In the fray, Palike’s demolition crew aimed their bulldozers at the properties of ordinary citizens, conveniently avoiding high-end villas and apartments. Revenue Minister R Ashoka listed 630 encroachments to be removed in the city and promised there would be no discrimination between the poor, middle class and rich, but his statement should be taken with a grain of salt . It is also unclear how the guilty officers and engineers will be held accountable.

By watering down its position, the government is doing Bangalore a huge disservice. Instead of resolving to find solutions before the next monsoon, taking the historical map of the city as a guide to eliminate encroachments and developing a comprehensive plan for the future, he seeks to cover up past wrongs. The Council also proposed to find scientific solutions instead of bulldozing expensive houses on a large scale. If the middle way seems desirable to all stakeholders, this is not the time for ad hoc solutions. The authorities should repair the damage and make Bangalore a model for other cities facing similar problems.

There is a noticeable change in the Karnataka government’s stance on the demolition of encroachments on lake beds, culverts and wetlands in Bengaluru. After the embarrassment of flooding along the IT Corridor a fortnight ago, the government had vehemently declared that all offending properties would be demolished, but suddenly it’s singing a different tune. He is now looking to conduct a “resurvey” of the affected region before razing any encroachment. Unsurprisingly, since the region is home to the who’s who of the corporate and startup world. The imperatives are clear: with the approach of municipal and legislative elections, the government cannot afford to ruffle important feathers; it must also protect the builder-politician bond that is primarily responsible for turning wetlands into a concrete jungle, and the role played by civic organizations in this ecological disaster. The Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP), which pretended to correct (its own) planning errors, launched bulldozers and compiled a list of big builders who got it wrong, and even demolished parts of a few properties. But not for long. The teardown campaign has become embroiled in political slander and a blame game between government and opposition. Meanwhile, some big builders have approached the High Court for a stay, giving the government a legitimate reason to stop all action. In the fray, Palike’s demolition crew aimed their bulldozers at the properties of ordinary citizens, conveniently avoiding high-end villas and apartments. Revenue Minister R Ashoka listed 630 encroachments to be removed in the city and promised there would be no discrimination between the poor, middle class and rich, but his statement should be taken with a grain of salt . It is also unclear how the guilty officers and engineers will be held accountable. By watering down its position, the government is doing Bangalore a huge disservice. Instead of resolving to find solutions before the next monsoon, taking the historical map of the city as a guide to eliminate encroachments and developing a comprehensive plan for the future, he seeks to cover up past wrongs. The Council also proposed to find scientific solutions instead of bulldozing expensive houses on a large scale. If the middle way seems desirable to all stakeholders, this is not the time for ad hoc solutions. The authorities should repair the damage and make Bangalore a model for other cities facing similar problems.